Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

3 Reasons Why Your New Year’s Resolutions Fail—and How to Fix Them
You don’t need a special day to come up with goals, but New Year’s Day is as good a time as any to build better habits. The problem is, by the time February rolls around, our best laid plans have often gone awry. Don’t let it happen this year: Heed these three simple tips for fail-proof resolutions.
PROBLEM 1: THEY’RE TOO OVERWHELMING
Let’s say your goal is to pay off $5000 worth of credit card debt this year. Since you’re giving yourself a long timeframe (all year) to pay it down, you end up procrastinating or splurging, telling yourself you’ll make up for it later. But the longer you push it off, the bigger and more overwhelming your once-reasonable goal can feel.
Solution: Set Smaller Milestones
The big picture is important, but connecting your goal to the present makes it more digestible and easier to stick with. Instead of vowing to pay off $5000 by the end of next December, make it your resolution to put $96 toward your credit card debt every week, for example.
In a study from the University of Wollongong, researchers asked subjects to save using one of two methods: a linear model and a cyclical model. In the linear model, the researchers told subjects that saving for the future was important and asked them to set aside money accordingly. In contrast, they told the cyclical group:
This approach acknowledges that one’s life consists of many small and large cycles, that is, events that repeat themselves. We want you to think of the personal savings task as one part of such a cyclical life. Make your savings task a routinized one: just focus on saving the amount that you want to save now, not next month, not next year. Think about whether you saved enough money during your last paycheck cycle. If you saved as much as you wanted, continue with your persistence. If you did not save enough, make it up this time, with the current paycheck cycle.
When subjects used this cyclical model, focusing on the present, they saved more than subjects who focused on their long-term goal.
PROBLEM 2: THEY’RE TOO VAGUE
“Find a better job” is a worthy goal, but it’s a bit amorphous. It’s unclear what “better” means to you, and it’s difficult to plot the right course of action when you’re not sure what your desired outcome is. Many resolutions are vague in this way: get in shape, worry less, spend more time with loved ones.
Solution: Make Your Goal a SMART One
To make your goal actionable, it should be SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound. When you set specific parameters and guidelines for your goal, it makes it easier to come up with an action plan. Under a bit more scrutiny, “spend more time with loved ones” might become “invite my best friends over for dinner every other Sunday night.” This new goal is specific, measurable, time-bound—it ticks all the boxes and tells you exactly what you want and how to get there.
PROBLEM 3: YOU FELL FOR THE “FALSE FIRST STEP”
“A false first step is when we try to buy a better version of ourselves instead of doing the actual work to accomplish it,” Anthony Ongaro of Break the Twitch tells Mental Floss. “The general idea is that purchasing something like a heart rate monitor can feel a lot like we’re taking a step towards our fitness goals,” Ongaro says. “The purchase itself can give us a dopamine release and a feeling of satisfaction, but it hasn’t actually accomplished anything other than spending some money on a new gadget.”
Even worse, sometimes that dopamine is enough to lure you away from your goal altogether, Ongaro says. “That feeling of satisfaction that comes with the purchase often is good enough that we don’t feel the need to actually go out for a run and use it.”
Solution: Start With What You Already Have
You can avoid this trap by forcing yourself to start your goal with the resources you already have on hand. “Whether the goal is to learn a new language or improve physical fitness, the best way to get started and avoid the false first step is to do the best you can with what you already have,” Ongaro says. “Start really small, even learning one new word per day for 30 days straight, or just taking a quick walk around the block every day.”
This isn’t to say you should never buy anything related to your goal, though. As Ongaro points out, you just want to make sure you’ve already developed the habit a bit first. “Establish a habit and regular practice that will be enhanced by a product you may buy,” he says. “It’s likely that you won’t even need that gadget or that fancy language learning software once you actually get started … Basically, don’t let buying something be the first step you take towards meaningful change in your life.”

BY KRISTIN WONG/Mentalfloss.com

Posted in All Stories, Annoucer Blogs, Kent Chambers Tagged with: ,

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